Monthly Archives: October 2014

The latest Coal news

Queensland plan to dump dredge spoil onshore ‘will not harm wetlands’

Deputy premier Jeff Seeney says despite conservation groups concerns, nationally significant wetland will be preserved

A controversial plan to dump dredge spoil onshore will not damage nationally significant wetland, Queenslands deputy premier, Jeff Seeney, says.

Three million cubic metres of dredged material linked to the expansion of the Abbot Point coal terminal near Bowen in north Queensland was destined to be dumped in waters off the Great Barrier Reef.

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Reserving gas for domestic users would hurt the renewable energy industry

The reserve our gas campaign may have populist appeal, but if it were successful it would only have a marginal impact on gas prices in Australia

This week, in response to the opening of the eastern liquefied natural gas (LNG) market to exports, the Australian Workers Union (AWU) has launched a campaign for the government to reserve an amount of LNG for local producers and households. But while such a populist policy may have a marginal impact by lowering gas prices, it would do so by subsidising inefficient industries and reducing incentives for renewable energy.

Back in March, I wrote how the opening of the eastern gas market to the world through the Gladstone port facility would increase gas prices for those living in the eastern states. So it was, with a bitter sort of validation, to receive a letter from my gas supplier in June that from 1 July 2014, there will be a 14.5 per cent increase in ACT gas prices. The reason given was the increasing influence of international markets on Australias gas prices.

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Canada switches on world’s first carbon capture power plant

Boundary Dam held up as first commercial-scale CCS plant and proof that coal-burning is compatible with cutting emissions

Canada has switched on the first large-scale coal-fired power plant fitted with a technology that proponents say enables the burning of fossil fuels without tipping the world into a climate catastrophe.

The project, the first commercial-scale plant equipped with carbon capture and storage technology, was held up by the coal industry as a real life example that it is possible to go on burning the dirtiest of fossil fuels while avoiding dangerous global warming.

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